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    Ohio Residents Debate the Government's Urge to Lower BAC Legal Limit

    Last updated 11 hours ago

    Currently, the federal blood alcohol content (BAC) limit is 0.08. Organizations such as the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) have recommended that the federal government lower the limit to 0.05, arguing that it could cut the risk of fatal crashes in half. However, advocacy organizations such as Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) remain neutral about the issue, pointing out that it took years to lower the limit from 0.10 to 0.08 and that there are other approaches to reducing drunk driving.

    As you’ll learn by watching this video, residents of Ohio appear divided on this issue. While the government continues to debate the proposition, millions are currently being spent on new technology that would prevent any car from being driven if the driver is impaired.

    The criminal defense attorneys of Rion, Rion & Rion of Dayton have extensive experience in defending those charged with DUI/OMVI. Call (937) 223-9133 to schedule a review of your DUI/OMVI case today.

    Disclaimer:

    The materials available at this website are for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Use and access to this website or any of the links contained within the site do not create an attorney-client relationship. The opinions expressed at or through this site are the opinions of the individual author and may not reflect the opinions of the firm or any individual attorney. 

    Understanding the Controlled Substances Act

    Last updated 1 day 6 hours ago

    Passed by the 91st Congress and signed by President Richard Nixon, the Controlled Substances Act is the federal U.S. drug policy that regulates the manufacture, importation, and possession of certain drugs. In regulating drugs, the legislation created five schedules for classifying controlled substances, with varying qualifications for each schedule. The Food and Drug Administration and the Drug Enforcement Agency help determine which substances to add or remove from the different schedules. 

    Introductory Provisions
    In drafting the Controlled Substances Act, Congress declared that illegal importation, manufacture, and distribution of certain controlled substances creates a detrimental effect on the American public’s health and overall welfare. In addition, illegal use of controlled substances affects interstate commerce through illegal transportation between states prior to possession. As a result, the local distribution and possession of controlled substances increase the interstate traffic being used for drug transportation purposes.

    Authority to Control
    The Controlled Substances Act outlines criteria and classification for various controlled substances. The Attorney General is expected to apply the provisions of the CSA; however, the Attorney General may also add to a certain schedule or transfer between schedules if he or she finds that a certain drug has potential for abuse and meets the criteria to be under a different schedule classification. In addition, the Attorney General may remove a drug or substance from the schedules if he or she rules that the drug doesn’t meet the criteria for being included in its particular schedule.

    Registration of Manufacturers
    In order to manufacture or distribute a controlled substance or List I chemical, a person needs to be granted registration by the Attorney General. The Attorney General will then determine the registration period, with the minimum and maximum registration periods being one and three years, respectively.

    If you’re facing federal drug charges, Rion, Rion & Rion will fight for your rights, honors, and freedoms. Since 1938, our Dayton law firm has handled federal felony and misdemeanor charges across the country. For more information, call our criminal defense attorneys at (937) 223-9133.  

    Disclaimer:

    The materials available at this website are for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Use and access to this website or any of the links contained within the site do not create an attorney-client relationship. The opinions expressed at or through this site are the opinions of the individual author and may not reflect the opinions of the firm or any individual attorney. 

    Ohio Man Confesses to DUI in YouTube Video

    Last updated 8 days ago

    Last October, an Ohio man received a prison sentence of six and a half years for causing a fatal DUI accident. The case caught national attention because the defendant uploaded a YouTube confession video after the incident. In the YouTube video, he pleaded with viewers to learn from his mistake and not drink and drive.

    Prior to reading the sentencing, the Ohio court played the YouTube video, in which the 22-year-old admitted to killing someone in a DUI accident. After a night of heavy drinking, the defendant turned the wrong way, fatally striking the victim’s car. This Associated Press report provides more details of the sentencing, showing the prosecutor asking for more than an eight-year prison sentence.     

    The criminal defense attorneys of Rion, Rion & Rion represent those facing felonies, misdemeanors, and DUI charges in Dayton. Call (937) 223-9133 to schedule a consultation with an experienced defense attorney if you or a loved one has been charged with a DUI or OMVI.

    Disclaimer:

    The materials available at this website are for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Use and access to this website or any of the links contained within the site do not create an attorney-client relationship. The opinions expressed at or through this site are the opinions of the individual author and may not reflect the opinions of the firm or any individual attorney. 

    An Overview of Federal Drug Trafficking Penalties

    Last updated 9 days ago

    Drug distribution and trafficking laws make it illegal to sell, manufacture, transport, and import controlled substances, including cocaine, heroin, marijuana, and methamphetamines. Several factors influence the severity of a drug trafficking charge, including the type of drugs involved, the geographic area of distribution, and whether or not children were involved. In drug trafficking cases, both federal and state laws are considered, as there is a variety of federal drug laws and each state has its own set of drug laws. 

    Schedule I Drugs
    The most common Schedule I drug is marijuana. If someone is charged with a first offense of trafficking 1,000 kilograms or more of marijuana, he or she faces a minimum of 10 years in prison. If death or serious bodily injury occurred, the defendant faces a minimum 20-year prison sentence. Individuals convicted of federal marijuana trafficking charges also face minimum fines of $10 million.

    Schedule II Drugs
    Schedule II drugs include cocaine, methamphetamine, and PCP. A first offense involving 500 to 4,999 grams of cocaine mixture carries a minimum five-year prison sentence and a maximum 40-year sentence. Trafficking between five and 49 grams pure or 50 to 499 grams mixture methamphetamines or transporting 10 to 99 grams of pure PCP carries the same sentence.

    Schedule IV Drugs
    Schedule IV substances carry potentially less severe penalties. Someone would have to be charged with trafficking between 40 and 399 grams mixture of Fentanyl to face a minimum five-year sentence. In addition, fines for a first offense are a maximum of $5 million for an individual and $25 million if not an individual. A second offense results in a minimum 10-year sentence and a maximum life sentence. In addition, fines for a second offense can’t exceed $8 million for an individual.

    Rion, Rion & Rion is made up of a team of experienced criminal defense lawyers ready to represent those charged with federal and misdemeanor drug crimes. If your loved one is facing federal drug charges, our criminal defense team will defend his or her rights, honor, and freedom. For more information, call our Dayton law firm at (937) 223-9133.

    Disclaimer:

    The materials available at this website are for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Use and access to this website or any of the links contained within the site do not create an attorney-client relationship. The opinions expressed at or through this site are the opinions of the individual author and may not reflect the opinions of the firm or any individual attorney. 

    Rion, Rion & Rion: A Look Back at 75 Years of Service in Dayton

    Last updated 18 days ago

    Since 1938, the criminal defense attorneys of Rion, Rion & Rion have defended the rights, honors, and freedoms of clients across the country. Based in Dayton, Ohio, our practice is dedicated to seeking truth and liberation for clients by protecting their freedoms and constitutional rights. This dedication has helped us consistently receive the highest rating from Martindale-Hubbell and continue to offer the best attorney representation in Dayton. 

    Jon Paul Rion
    Under the field of criminal law, Jon Paul Rion is listed in Best Lawyers in America. During his legal career, Jon Paul Rion has tried more than one hundred felony jury trials, including capital cases. Acting as president of Rion, Rion & Rion, Jon Rion is a third-generation criminal defense lawyer, carrying out the work his grandfather began in 1938. In addition, Jon Paul Rion is on the Board of Directors of the Ohio Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and is a lifetime member of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers.

    John H. Rion
    Also a member of our three-generation Dayton law firm, John H. Rion is board certified in the field of criminal law, being consistently listed in the Best Lawyers in America since 1983. He is also a former president of the Ohio Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. Serving for two terms as Chairman of the Criminal Justice Committee of the Ohio State Bar Association, Mr. Rion has personally tried more than 300 felony jury trials, including capital cases.

    Paul W. Rion
    Paul W. Rion is the founder of Rion, Rion & Rion, as well as John H. Rion’s father and Jon Paul Rion’s grandfather. Beginning his own law firm in 1938, Paul Rion practiced law for more than 30 years, serving as a frequent acting judge in Dayton Municipal court.

    If you would like to learn more about Criminal Defense Attorneys, Rion, Rion & Rion, you can schedule a free consultation in our Dayton office. Our experienced criminal defense attorneys handle a range of cases, including felonies and DUIs. You can reach our office by dialing (937) 999-2316.

    Disclaimer:
    The materials available at this website are for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Use and access to this website or any of the links contained within the site do not create an attorney-client relationship. The opinions expressed at or through this site are the opinions of the individual author and may not reflect the opinions of the firm or any individual attorney. 



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