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    How to Talk to Your Child About Divorce

    Last updated 6 hours 35 minutes ago

    Though recognizing that you need to get a divorce may be tough, it can ultimately improve your life. Still, your family will likely go through months or years of difficulty before finding a happy status quo. Divorce is perhaps most difficult for children, who are suddenly forced to say goodbye to the only life they’ve known. As a parent, you can make the divorce process as painless as possible by following these tips. 

    Prepare the Talk Beforehand
    Generally speaking, it’s a good idea for both parents to deliver the news of divorce together. Before you and your spouse sit your child down for a talk, plan out what you’re going to say. Try to anticipate your child’s questions and show that you and your spouse are of the same mind.  

    Answer Questions Honestly
    Telling half-truths or outright lies will only confuse and upset your child later on. Still, you don’t have to provide intimate details of your marriage. If your child asks why you’re getting a divorce, tell him that you and your spouse simply don’t get along anymore.

    Provide Assurances
    You must tell your child that the divorce has nothing to do with him. Assure your child that you love her now and always, but that you and your spouse will be happier apart. Be sure to mention that you will both still be involved in your child’s life, and that you’ll try to minimize changes.  

    Don’t Blame the Other Parent
    Presenting a unified point of view is the healthiest way to discuss divorce with your child. Though it may be tempting, you should refrain from blaming your spouse. Compromising your child’s relationship with her other parent will only make the divorce process more difficult.

    The divorce attorneys at Rion, Rion & Rion have decades of experience helping Dayton residents get through the divorce process. We can represent your interests and your child’s interests during negotiations and in court, if necessary. Call (937) 223-9133 to schedule an appointment.  

    Spotlight on Estate Administration

    Last updated 11 days ago

    After a loved one dies, handling legal and financial matters is often very difficult for surviving family members. Going through the grieving process is challenging enough without dealing with the decedent’s final affairs. This is one reason why it’s advisable to hire a criminal defense lawyer with experience in estate administration. The lawyer’s services and expertise can reduce stress for all involved family members.

    A criminal defense lawyer can handle all aspects of estate administration, including preparing creditors’ claims, filing any required pleadings, and handling estate tax forms. He or she can settle debts and distribute assets to beneficiaries. In the event that there is a dispute within the family, the lawyer can conduct negotiations and attempt to resolve issues with minimal conflict. The lawyer will maintain ongoing communication with all involved family members with regard to the administration of the estate.

    The criminal defense team at Rion, Rion & Rion understands the challenging time ahead for surviving family members. Contact us at (937) 223-9133 and let our skilled lawyers handle estate administration for your family.

    Disclaimer:

    The materials available at this website are for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Use and access to this website or any of the links contained within the site do not create an attorney-client relationship. The opinions expressed at or through this site are the opinions of the individual author and may not reflect the opinions of the firm or any individual attorney.

    The Dangers of Police Misconduct

    Last updated 19 days ago

    Police officers undoubtedly have a dangerous job. Unfortunately, while no one is above the law, they may sometimes cross the line when handling a suspect. Police misconduct can take many forms. A police officer may violate a suspect’s rights during an interview, for example, which may cause a person to confess under false pretenses. Violations of civil rights can not only derail an individual’s case; they can also severely damage that person’s credibility and reputation. A criminal defense lawyer can ensure that a suspect’s rights are upheld or that an individual does not suffer adverse consequences because of civil rights violations.

    Other examples of police misconduct involve acts of physical force. A police officer may exert more force than is necessary to bring a suspect into custody. Victims of police misconduct have been known to suffer serious injuries, such as concussions, bone fractures, and internal bleeding. Some victims of police misconduct have lost their lives.

    If you or a loved one has been a victim of possible police misconduct, you can explore your legal rights and recourse with help from the criminal defense team at Rion, Rion & Rion. Call our criminal defense lawyers at (937) 223-9133 right away to arrange a consultation.

    Disclaimer:

    The materials available at this website are for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Use and access to this website or any of the links contained within the site do not create an attorney-client relationship. The opinions expressed at or through this site are the opinions of the individual author and may not reflect the opinions of the firm or any individual attorney.

    Understanding Wrongful Death

    Last updated 27 days ago

    When an individual loses his or her life because of another person’s negligent or intentional actions, that person may be held accountable for death in criminal court. The person may face felony or misdemeanor charges related to the death. However, surviving family members of the decedent may also choose to pursue justice in civil court by working with a criminal defense lawyer. A criminal defense lawyer can file a wrongful death lawsuit against the negligent party, demanding compensation for the losses of the surviving family members.

    Wrongful Death Laws
    When America was in its infancy, common law did not allow surviving family members to bring actions against a negligent party. Today, the law recognizes that even when an individual dies, the negligent party should still be held accountable. Under the law, surviving family members have the right to demand compensation from the person deemed to be responsible for the passing of the decedent. Compensation may be available to pay the decedent’s final medical bills, funeral expenses, loss of future wages, and pain and suffering.

    Wrongful Death Plaintiffs
    Often, criminal defense lawyers represent immediate family members of the decedent, including spouses and children. Some states allow more flexibility with regard to who may file a wrongful death lawsuit. In some states, any person who has suffered a financial loss because of the death may file a lawsuit.

    Wrongful Death Causes
    A wrongful death lawsuit may be filed for a variety of reasons. Often, the basis is medical malpractice. For example, a physician may have committed an error during surgery, failed to diagnose a fatal condition, or failed to prescribe the proper course of treatment for a fatal condition. Wrongful death lawsuits may also be filed with regard to a death caused by a motor vehicle accident.

    The criminal defense lawyers at Rion, Rion & Rion extend our deepest sympathies to surviving family members of those who lost their lives through the negligent actions of another. We invite you to put the resources of our criminal defense law firm to work for your family to hold those responsible for the death accountable for their actions. Schedule a consultation with a criminal defense lawyer today by calling (937) 223-9133.

    Disclaimer:

    The materials available at this website are for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Use and access to this website or any of the links contained within the site do not create an attorney-client relationship. The opinions expressed at or through this site are the opinions of the individual author and may not reflect the opinions of the firm or any individual attorney.

    Exploring the Recent Supreme Court Ruling on Cell Phone Searches

    Last updated 2 months ago

    Under the law, when a police officer arrests an individual, he or she can search any personal property in that individual’s possession at the time. Until recently, cell phones were fair game. However, a recent ruling handed down by the Supreme Court changed that, requiring police officers to obtain a search warrant before looking through a suspect’s cell phone. The decision was unanimous.

    In his opinion, Chief Justice John Roberts noted that cell phones are not merely tools for communications, but that they are commonly used to store an incredible amount of highly personal information. Therefore, the Court decided that searches of cell phones without search warrants were “unreasonable” and violated the Fourth Amendment rights of Americans. Police officers may still search a person’s cell phone if they first obtain a search warrant.

    If you believe your family member’s Fourth Amendment rights were violated, contact a criminal defense attorney promptly. Call Rion, Rion & Rion, a criminal defense law firm, at (937) 223-9133 to arrange for aggressive legal defense against federal and state felonies and misdemeanors.

    Disclaimer:

    The materials available at this website are for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. Use and access to this website or any of the links contained within the site do not create an attorney-client relationship. The opinions expressed at or through this site are the opinions of the individual author and may not reflect the opinions of the firm or any individual attorney.



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